2014 Peabody Award winners: 'House of Cards,' 'Scandal' and more

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2014-peabody-awards-house-of-cards-scandal.jpgThe 2014 Peabody Award winners were announced Wednesday (April 2) on "CBS This Morning," honoring excellence on television, radio and the Internet. The awards, chosen by the University of Georgia Grady School of Journalism, will be handed out May 19 and the ceremony will air on Pivot later that month.

Awards include (full list can be found here):

"Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown" (CNN): Whether Bourdain's tireless search for new taste experiences takes him to Myanmar or Detroit, he never fails to find great stories to go with the food.

"Breaking Bad" (AMC): Through a stunning brand of visual storytelling and meticulous character development, we were able to explore the darkest chambers of a human heart in a way never before seen on TV. Over five seasons, Vince Gilligan made good on his promise to utterly transform Walter White from Mr. Chips into Scarface.

"The Bridge" (FX): A crime drama set in motion by a murder victim left literally on the border of West Texas and Northern Mexico, its rare, non-stereotypical depiction of two cultures rubbing against and informing each other is as fascinating as the mystery.

"Broadchurch" (BBC America): A peaceful, picturesque seaside town in England is rattled to its core by the murder of a young boy in this intricately crafted, emotionally rich, endlessly surprising mystery series.

"The Central Park Five" (PBS): A tragic story, finally told in full, The Central Park Five reexamines not only the case of black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were railroaded and wrongly imprisoned for a rape but the climate of fear and the media frenzy that surrounded their trial.

"FRONTLINE: League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis" (PBS): Undeterred by the National Football League's defense, FRONTLINE's investigative team produced a solidly-sourced, high-impact documentary about the extent of brain damage among players, a story still reverberating throughout the world of sports.

"House of Cards" (Netflix): By releasing an entire season of episodes at once, Netflix took binge viewing to a new level and obliterated the idea that a hit TV show needs a slot in prime time. We are able to follow Frank Underwood's political schemes at our own pace and immerse ourselves in the show's version of Washington, D.C., where desperation for power is the capital city's lifeblood.

"Key & Peele" (Comedy Central): It's like Abbott and Costello meet Richard Pryor when the duo of Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele fearlessly apply their mischievous minds and satirical savvy to racially aware sketches both broad and incisive.

"Orange Is the New Black" (Netflix): Orange Is the New Black turns a notorious drive-in genre - women behind bars - into a complex, riveting character study rich in insights about femininity, race, power, and the politics, inside and outside prison walls, of mass incarceration.

"Orphan Black" (BBC America): It's all about cloning, but Orphan Black is one of a kind -- a super-charged, stylized sci-fi action serial that ponders identity, humanity, bioethics and genetic research when it occasionally stops for breath. Titiana Mislany is a marvel in the title role.

"The Returned" (Les Revenants) (Sundance Channel): Thoughtfully conceptualized, exquisitely photographed and sensitively acted, this supernatural drama explores loss, grief, memory, guilt and our notions of afterlife as deceased residents of a picturesque mountain town in France seemingly return. It's elegant, it's zombie-free and it's still unnerving.

"Scandal" (ABC): Loosely based on the exploits of a real Washington, D.C. "fixer," turbocharged by Kerry Washington's star turn, Scandal is part West Wing and part Dynasty, an exaggerated, outrageous, fun-house reflection of the real-life political shenanigans we've come to loathe and jeer.

Tom Brokaw: Personal Award

A personal Peabody is given to Tom Brokaw, the longtime reporter and anchor of NBC Nightly News. With his TV projects and celebrated books like The Greatest Generation, the anchor emeritus has only enhanced his reputation since he left the desk in 2004.

Photo/Video credit: Netflix, ABC