'A to Z,' 'Bad Judge,' 'Mulaney': Five fall 2014 comedies we can't wait to see

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Last week, Hypable covered the five least promising new comedies of the Fall 2014 season, and now, it's only fair we present the five most promising new comedies of this upcoming season. 
Turns out, where ABC looks to have weak comedies, Fox is strong out the gate with two promising comedies landing on our list and the return of successful shows like "New Girl," "The Mindy Project" and "Brooklyn Nine-Nine."

On an interesting note, NBC has completely done away with the Thursday night comedy block that held fast for so many years -- it's been nine years since "The Office" became an anchor for the night. While the peacock network has seen its best ratings in years this past season, that wasn't enough for it to bring "Community" back or "Parks and Recreation" for a full final season. 

After losing "How I Met Your Mother" and finally giving up "Two and a Half Men," CBS is looking to probably rebuild their comedy catalog. Sure, they have shows like "The Millers" and "Mom," but after newbies "Friends with Better Lives" (which wasn't so bad in the end) and "The Crazy Ones" (one of our favorite new shows) failed to see Season 2, it's back to the drawing board.

 

"A to Z," NBC


One just cut off his nipple on "Mad Men," the other made sporadic appearances on "How I Met Your Mother" for the last season, playing a titular character who ended up being dead the entire time. But that was in the past, and for Ben Feldman and Cristin Milioti, the new NBC sitcom "A to Z" is their future. There is something gimmicky about the trailer, but it seems like a perfectly enjoyable show that would be paired well with "About a Boy" Season 2.

 

"Mulaney," FOX


It's been 25 years since "Seinfeld" premiered, and "Mulaney" might be the show to be its worthy successor. The elements all feel similar, but with comedians like Nasim Pedrad -- who formally left "Saturday Night Live" t the end of this season -- Seaton Smith, Elliott Gould, and Martin Short, this cast can stand on their own legs just fine. While there is a sense of a plot in the preview video, it seems to err more on the "show about nothing" side rather than a complex story. Which, for us, is just fine. If you liked Stefan from "SNL" (and be honest -- who didn't?) you'll most likely enjoy "Mulaney," as John Mulaney wrote for the former character.

 

This show might seem run of the mill, but the humor continues to build throughout the trailer. Based on the memoir by the real Eddie Huang of the same name, this show has the gift of hindsight that will allow it to have prosperous story lines for seasons to come. Born to Taiwan immigrants, Eddie, his two bothers, parents and grandmother, move to Orlando, FL so his father can fulfill the American Dream of owning a cowboy restaurant. This show could enter dangerous territory when trying to take on the differences between the American and Asian lifestyles, but we'll hope the writers know what they're doing. On a somewhat related note: someone over at ABC is not doing a great job thinking up show titles. This is the latest in a long line of poorly-named shows, and while we say we don't judge books by their cover, "Cougar Town," "Trophy Wife," "Selfie" and "Fresh Off the Boat" should have all been reconsidered.



"Bad Teacher" failed miserably this past spring. But that was CBS, this is NBC, and "Bad Judge" has Kate Walsh. Cuttingly sarcastic, Judge Rebecca Wright might put the screws to those who appear in her Los Angeles County Circuit Court, but is a mess in just about every other aspect of her life. This show could become something great if they flush out Rebecca as she attempts to help Robby Shoemaker, whose parents are behind bars thanks to her. It helps that Theodore Barnes, who plays Robby, is very adorable.




It's important to remember that this list is about new comedies that show promise. While we do not feel "Black-sh" will be a hit right off the bat, it definitely has room to grow. Concerned that his family is losing touch with their heritage, Andre Jonson (Anthony Anderson), looks to reconnect with his roots. His son, meanwhile, wants to be called Andy, play field hockey and have a bar mitzvah for his thirteenth birthday. The bright parts of the trailer are definitely Laurence Fishburne's humorously Pops, who sits just off to the side, assuming the role as the peanut gallery. Certainly a refreshing change of pace from his recent work on "Hannibal."

What shows are you looking forward to?

Let us know in the comments!
Photo/Video credit: ABC / FOX / NBC / CBS