Alice Walker rejects Hebrew edition of 'The Color Purple' because of Israel's treatment of the Palestinian people

alice-walker-the-color-purple-getty.jpg Alice Walker, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Color Purple," has said she won't let an Israeli publishing company release a Hebrew edition of the book because she objects to Israel's treatment of the Palestinian people, reports the AP.

She writes in a letter to the publishing company Yediot Books:

"I would so like knowing my books are read by the people of your country, especially by the young and by the brave Israeli activists (Jewish and Palestinian) for justice and peace I have had the joy of working beside. I am hopeful that one day, maybe soon, this may happen. But now is not the time."

Netta Gurevich, chief editor of Yediot Books, says in a statement that arts and literature "are so important to bridging differences, presenting 'the other' and generating a climate of tolerance and compassion. That's all the more so when talking about 'The Color Purple, a book that addresses discrimination, otherness and the importance of the individual's struggle against injustice in general."

Walker is an vocal pro-Palestinian activist and is part of a movement that seeks to pressure Israel to end its rule over the Palestinian people through boycotts, divestment and sanctions.



Photo/Video credit: Getty Images