Bob Dylan lost interview reveals heroin addiction, suicidal thoughts in early 1960s

bob-dylan-getty.jpgThe BBC News is reporting on a previously unheard interview of singer/songwriter Bob Dylan made on tapes by Robert Shelton. The tapes were made in 1966 after a concert in Lincoln, NE on the way to Denver. Interviewer Shelton describes the interview as a "kaleidoscopic monologue."

In the interview, Dylan talks about his heroin addiction in the early 60s and his contemplation of suicide at one point after people started calling him a genius. These tapes are the first time he had spoken completely candidly about such things.

"I kicked a heroin habit in New York City. I got very, very strung out for a while, I mean really, very strung out. And I kicked the habit. I had about a $25-a-day habit and I kicked it," says Dylan.

"Death to me is nothing... death to me means nothing as long as I can die fast. Many times I've known I could have been able to die fast, and I could have easily gone over and done it."

"I'll admit to having this suicidal thing... but I came through this time .... I'm not the kind of cat that's going to cut off an ear if I can't do something. I'm the kind of cat that would just commit suicide.I'd shoot myself in the brain if things got bad. I'd jump from a window... man, I would shoot myself. You know I can think about death, man, openly," says Dylan.

Dylan turns 70 Tuesday (May 24). According to the BBC, a film is now in production about the tapes.


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