'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' review: A 10-tie situation of funny

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brooklyn-nine-nine-cast.jpg "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is the newest offering from Dan Goor and Michael Schur, the creative team behind NBC's critically-acclaimed comedy "Parks and Recreation." It chronicles the titular police precinct, led by Det. Jake Peralta ( Andy Samberg), Det. Amy Santiago ( Melissa Fumero) and newly-appointed Captain Ray Holt ( Andre Braugher).

Like "Parks and Rec," this workplace comedy has a plethora of comedic storylines at its disposal -- in fact, "Brooklyn" arguably has more, being set in a police department in the biggest city in the U.S., as opposed to a local government office in a small Indiana town.

Also like "Parks and Rec," while there is a "Saturday Night Live" alum as the quote-unquote star, the supporting cast is rich and varied. Finally, like "Parks and Rec," the heart is apparent from the get-go, which is what every great comedy needs at its core.

Samberg's Peralta is a goofball -- would you expect anything less from the comedian? -- but it is also demonstrated right from the start that he's a good cop. He's partnered with another good cop, Santiago, and the two of them care about the work they do, which is huge.

It's why we could watch Michael Scott be ridiculous all those years -- we all knew how much he loved his work and also that he was actually pretty good at it.

Add in openly gay Captain Holt, who has an interesting backstory, which the creators told us at TCA press tour will continue to be explored on the show, and the excellent supporting cast of Chelsea Peretti, Terry Crews, Joe Lo Truglio and Stephanie Beatriz and you've got a good formula for a fun half-hour comedy.

In fact, Beatriz might be our new favorite person on TV. Her surly Det. Rosa Diaz is a new character not to be missed. She's delightful.

The creators were not wrong when they said that old-school cop comedy "Barney Miller" was a big influence -- that is apparent all over the pilot, though the episode still feels very current. There are some funny running gags, like proper workplace attire ("This is a 10-tie situation"), and character-driven long arcs set up as well.

We also love the lineup the show is a part of -- save the atrocious "Dads" -- but "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" could help FOX have a solid two-hour comedy block on Tuesday nights.

"Brooklyn Nine-Nine" premieres Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 8:30 p.m.ET/PT on FOX.
Photo/Video credit: FOX