Conrad Murray trial: Michael Jackson situation 'did not seem normal' according to paramedic

conrad-murray-trial-getty.jpgAs the prosecution lays out their case in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Michael Jackson's doctor Conrad Murray, they continue to hammer home the point of the doctor's negligence and recklessness.

Los Angeles Fire Department paramedic Michael Senneff testified Friday (Sept. 30) that when he arrived at the pop singer's home after receiving the 911 call, the situation seemed wrong.

"Simply, that did not add up to me -- doctors in the house, IV pull, IV hooked up to the patient -- it simply did not seem normal," Senneff says.

He added Murray did not mention the singer was taking propofol, the medication that contributed to the singers 2009 death.

Senneff testifies, "He [Murray] said, 'No he's not taking anything,' then he followed that up by saying, 'I just gave him a little bit of lorazepam to help him sleep."

The opening days of the trial have offered testimony from a number of witnesses who call the behavior of Conrad Murray into question.

Alberto Alvarez, one of Jackson's employees, told the court that Murray waited at least 25 minutes after finding Jackson unconscious before calling 911.

On Wednesday (Sept. 28) Jackson's chef, Kai Chase, said a "frantic" Murray ran into the kitchen after finding Jackson, but he didn't call 911.

Jackson died on June 25, 2009 from what the coroner said was an overdose of the surgical anesthetic propofol combined lorazepam and midazolam.

The trial is expected to last four to six weeks. If convicted, Murray could land in prison for four years and lose his medical license.
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