Doritos creator Arch West taking his tasty chips to the grave

doritos-arch-west.jpg Arch West, who in the early 1960s created the first mass-marketed tortilla chip -- the Dorito -- died earlier in September at age 97. In a fitting tribute, West's daughter says the family plans to sprinkle his chips into his grave.

"We are tossing Doritos chips in before they put the dirt over the urn," his daughter, Jana Hacker, told the Dallas Morning News. "He'll love it."

According to Wikipedia, West got the idea for the Dorito when he stopped at a California snack shack while on a family vacation and was served fried tortilla chips.

Doritos were first sold in 1964 (meaning the Frito-Lay folks have a season to figure out "Pan Am" product placement) and the name is believed to be an abbreviated form of "Doradito" which means "little gold" in Spanish. Around the office we all thought it meant "cheesy goodness" and "salt bloat," but apparently we were wrong.

In 1994, Frito-Lay spent $50 redesigning the chip to make it 20 percent larger and 15 percent thinner. It also got rounded corners and a stronger taste in the upgrade. In 2002, the company reportedly removed trans fats from the chip (so it's good for us, right?).

Recently, Frito-Lay launched several new curious flavors, including "Blazin' Buffalo Ranch" and -- we kid you not -- "Late Night All-Nighter Cheeseburger." 
Photo/Video credit: Archive