'Fat Guys in the Woods' teaches couch potatoes wilderness skills

Add to Favorites | Fat Guys in the Woods
×
Remove from Favorites
Fat Guys in the Woods has been added to your favorites.
OK
CANCEL
fat-guys-in-the-woods-creek-stewart-twc.jpg
The title of The Weather Channel's survival show, "Fat Guys in the Woods," premiering Sunday, Aug. 10, begs jokes.

Sure, these guys have an advantage of being able to live off their fat than leaner folks would, but they initially seem frightfully ill-prepared for the wild.

But Creek Stewart, and yes, that's the name the host and survival guide uses, comes to the rescue. He leads couch potatoes into the wild and teaches them how to survive.

"Survival scenarios happen to people in all walks of life, all the time, in all zip codes," Stewart tells Zap2it from Anchorage, Alaska. "Mother Nature doesn't discriminate and real disasters happen to real people."

In the pilot, he explains how to set snares, start fires and other necessary skills.

"The unique thing about survival is the situation and environment doesn't matter," Stewart says. "Our survival needs are always the same."

Essentially it is a system of threes, Stewarts says. Healthy adults can survive three hours without shelter, three days without water and three weeks without food.

"Those survival rules of three dictate your survival priorities," he says.

In the first season's eight episodes, Stewart takes fat guys into the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee because, he says, "it's such a diverse area every episode looks completely different."

Stewart began his love of the outdoors growing up in a "tiny corn town" in southeastern Indiana. He was an Eagle Scout, and later taught survival skills.

By the end of the pilot, Stewart reveals that he learns from the guys.

"I expected to go into this series and be the one who inspired," he says. "I left the season really feeling I was the one who was inspired. I went into the woods with a bunch of incredible guys, who really sought personal change, maybe they wanted to go back to school or rekindle a relationship but they wanted to bring about something positive in their lives."

Ultimately, their journey uplifted Stewart. "These guys go through extreme obstacles and do not give up," he said.
Photo/Video credit: The Weather Channel