'Franklin & Bash' Season 4: Mark-Paul Gosselaar and Breckin Meyer take on new roles

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As the fourth season of TNT's lawyer comedy-drama "Franklin & Bash" opens on Wednesday, Aug. 13, the attorney duo of Jared Franklin (Breckin Meyer) and Peter Bash (Mark-Paul Gosselaar) is in a familiar position.

Even though the two left their ambulance-chasing past behind to join eccentric lawyer Stanton Infeld's (Malcolm McDowell) high-end firm, all has not gone well.

Sitting with Gosselaar in a trailer next to the beach in Malibu, Calif., Meyer explains to Zap2it, "We're kind of in the place where we were at the beginning of the show, which is, we've got to figure out how to make some money and save the ship. We start off on the Titanic.

"But they've got each other, and they've got a low-cost rental in Malibu."

One thing fans can look forward to in the 10-episode season is an installment called "Honor Thy Mother," with Meyer as writer and Gosselaar as director. Meyer was busy on the now-defunct "Men at Work," the TBS comedy he executive-produces, when he was asked to pen an episode of "Franklin & Bash."

"When they showed me," he says, "it was slated to be the one he was going to direct, I was like, 'I can't not.' I love the idea of it being written and directed by Franklin and Bash."

Meyer wasn't at all worried about putting himself in Gosselaar's hands.

"There's no question whether he's up for it," he says. "He's overdue. He's been talking about directing since 'NYPD Blue' days. It wasn't like he just showed up. It was never like he looked over and didn't seem like he knew exactly like he was doing."

For Gosselaar, part of it is getting credit for what he does every day.

"We've always joked," he says, " 'Oh, you're not the director; you're not the writer.' But we are there all the time, so we do know what the director wants; we know what the writers want, what the producers want.

"Now, it' just that I have that tile. I can walk up to an actor and say, 'Do it this way,' and they actually have to listen to me."
Photo/Video credit: TNT