'Game of Thrones' Season 4: Arya crossing names off her list isn't making her happier, says Maisie Williams

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game-of-thrones-maisie-williams-season-4-arya-hbo.jpgArya Stark's prayer of vengeance has come to define her character on "Game of Thrones," but Maisie Williams says it's not fixing the hole inside of her.

"She's realizing the more people that she kills, she doesn't feel anything. It's not making her any happier," Williams tells Zap2it. "She's just like, 'Why can't I feel anything anymore?' And she's just given up on that, and given up on direction."

In Season 4, episode 7 "Mockingbird," Arya learns she can cross Joffrey Baratheon's name off her list, and sees Rorge and the Biter dead as well. But she still is at a loss for what to do with her future.

"I think if [she found out] Bran and Sansa were alive, her reaction would kind of be like, 'Great, good luck for them,'" Williams admits. "When the Hound says that he might book passage across the Narrow Sea, they speak about what they're going to do. She's just thinking, 'Where do I fit into that? Maybe I have to think about what I'm going to do now.'"

But Arya has been learning a lot from the Hound of how to survive. Williams says she considers the Hound's "How many Starks they need to behead before you figure it out?" line to be a wakeup call for Arya.

"Your heart drops, and she's like, I've been doing it wrong," Williams admits of her character. "Like, thank you. ... I think then she's like, oh my god. It's the whole thing about them respecting each other. She's like, 'Will I take this advice? Of course I will.'"

Fans can look forward to Arya taking control of her own destiny soon. "They're heading to the Eyrie, but then again there's never a discussion after that of where they're going to now. They both think about it a lot and they want to ask each other, 'Well, what do you want to do now?' But they won't, and they just keep walking and keep walking and hope that in a minute they'll get a direction and they'll do that," she says. 

"For as long as she's under his watch, she's just going with him, and is not deliberately trying to do anything. Anyone she comes across along the way she'll take out, but she's not going after that," Williams continues. "From episode 1 to 10, there isn't much in terms of what she wants to do. She's just going with the flow until episode 10, when she gets control again of what she wants to do."

"Game of Thrones" returns from its Memorial Day hiatus on June 1 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on HBO.
Photo/Video credit: HBO