'Game of Thrones' Season 4: First four episode titles, with explanations

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game-of-thrones-season-4-episode-2-the-lion-and-the-flower.jpgThe speculation can officially begin: The episode titles for the first four installments of  "Game of Thrones" Season 4 have been released.

As viewers of the show know, "Game of Thrones" episode titles offer huge clues to what happens in each episode. "Baelor" referred to the statue Arya was watching from when Ned Stark was killed in Season 1. "Blackwater" was the epic Season 2 Battle of Blackwater. And the "Rains of Castamere," of course, was the song playing when the Starks were slaughtered at Season 3's Red Wedding.

While hopefully the Season 4 episode titles don't foretell such horrific events, there definitely is some information to be gleaned from them. Without further ado, episode 1 is "Two Swords" (58 minutes in length), episode 2 is "The Lion and the Rose" (52 minutes), episode 3 is "Breaker of Chains" (56 minutes) and episode 4 is "Oathkeeper" (54 minutes).

Now let's break down what those likely mean, shall we? Those who want to avoid spoilers should not keep reading this post.

"Two Swords" will likely refer to certain imagery viewers already saw in the "Game of Thrones Ice and Fire: A Foreshadowing" special. There's also a good chance the title has some metaphoric significance in some other storylines beyond the obvious one.

"The Lion and the Rose" is also pretty obvious. The lion, of course, is a Lannister -- Joffrey, in this case -- and the rose is a Tyrell -- Margaery. Considering it's no secret that the engaged couple  marry this season, you can bet some money that's happening in this episode.

"Breaker of Chains" gets a bit trickier. Chances are the episode 3 title refers to Daenerys' storyline, as she has been freeing slaver cities left and right during the past few seasons. But, like "Two Swords," there's likely also some metaphoric significance here.

"Oathkeeper" is only obvious to fans who have read the books. Let's just say that it will likely tie back to "Two Swords" in a pretty significant way, and involve this storyline. It also could refer to Jon Snow discussing the Night's Watch oaths he broke in Season 3.

"Game of Thrones" Season 4 premieres Sunday, April 6 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on HBO.
Photo/Video credit: HBO