'Game of Thrones' Season 4: The Red Viper being bisexual is 'pure logic,' says Pedro Pascal

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game-of-thrones-season-4-red-viper-bisexual.jpgAs proven in the "Game of Thrones" Season 4 premiere, sex is fair game for the Red Viper. Pedro Pascal's character Oberyn Martell is the first openly bisexual person of power on the series, but the introduction of a man who loves both men and women equally wasn't a big deal for him or showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss.

"There weren't any conversations about that in particular," Pascal tells Zap2it. "It's not particularly special to Oberyn that he takes pleasure in all beautiful things, whether it be in the shape of a woman or if it be in the shape of a man. To him, it's pure logic. I think we never made an issue about it. It was never like, 'Let's discuss this.'"

He continues, "We never had a discussion about his bisexuality and what exactly that means. It's just who he is. It's like, he'll enjoy the best wine, he'll put on the best clothing, he'll learn the best fights and he'll love the best people. It was really about that. There was no self-consciousness about it at all."

In the George R.R. Martin "A Song of Ice and Fire" novels, the Red Viper's sexuality was implied but never overtly mentioned. It was no secret that he was a character who was partial to love and lust, and Pascal is pleased that Benioff and Weiss chose to use Oberyn as a way to include bisexuality in the world of Westeros.

"David and Dan are such enormous bada**es. They're not taken something from the 17th century or anything like that," he says. "The books are brilliant, and it's beyond brilliant source material for them, but they're still kind of seizing the opportunity to be really progressive and new and just surprising and smart around issues that are so present for us today, whether it be around gender, around sexuality, around race. I find them to be very smartly, smartly progressive in the way that they kind of insert it into what is essentially fantasy genre."

"Game of Thrones" airs Sundays on HBO at 9 p.m. ET/PT.
Photo/Video credit: HBO