'Game of Thrones': See how big George R.R. Martin plans Daenerys' dragons to grow

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"Game of Thrones'" dragons are growing bigger and bigger with each passing season, but just how big will they get? Large enough for a person to be able to stand on their neck and still be dwarfed by the size of the dragon, apparently.

Author George R.R. Martin released a story from his upcoming October release "World of Ice and Fire," an encyclopedia he's been working on about the world his stories are set in. The excerpt in question is about Daenerys Targaryen's ancestor King Aegon I Targaryen, who is also known as Aegon the Conquerer.

Aegon is extremely significant to the history of Westeros and the Targaryen dynasty: He founded King's Landing, forged the Iron Throne, formed the positions of the Kingsguard and Hand of the King, and also married not one but two of his sisters, Visenya and Rhaenys. Both of his sisters rode dragons, and Aegon rode a massive black beast known as Balerion the Black Dread.

The above photo depicts Aegon riding on Balerion, and Martin confirms that this is what he envisions the size of a full grown dragon to be. Guess what that means? Daenerys's dragons will grow to be that size as well. Showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss said in a recent interview with Entertainment Weekly that in the final season of "Game of Thrones," Dany's dragons will be full grown (if they're still alive). 

"Think about the skull Arya hides in during Season 1 -- that's supposed to be a full-sized dragon," Benioff says. "And our dragons are still not even close to that. By the time we get to the end, Season 7, that's where they have to get to -- assuming they survive."

Makes the below Martin-approved drawing of Aegon riding Balerion that much cooler when you realize that might be Daenerys in three seasons, don't you think?

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"Game of Thrones" airs Sundays on HBO at 9 p.m. ET/PT.
Photo/Video credit: HBO/J. Gonzalez