George Takei's Facebook page revealed to be ghostwritten

george-takei-facebook-ghostwritten-gi.jpgFor fans of George Takei's socially conscious and often very funny Facebook page, this news might sting a little bit: It's not all Takei, all the time.

Journalist Rick Polito revealed to Romenesko.com that he'd been writing jokes for Takei's feed, telling the website that he'd been receiving $10 a joke. It was a quick aside in an e-mail, not meant to be some shocking expose, but it stunned Takei's fans nonetheless.

Wired got in touch with Takei, who was taken aback at the uproar the news has caused. After all, his e-book "Oh Myyy," which was released back in November, touched on the fact that some content came from others, whom he'd dubbed "George Fakei."

"What is this hoo-ha about my FB posts?" Takei say. "I have Brad, my husband, to help me and interns to assist. What is important is the reliability of my posts being there to greet my fans with a smile or a giggle every morning. That's how we keep on growing."

The "Star Trek" icon says that when he's on the road, his team will post things he'd previously written, on his behalf. Outside writers, including Polito, supply funny photos, which Takei credits as "from a fan." But he insists that he writes every last word mocking them.

"The commentaries are mine," Takei says. "They are authentically mine, I assure you."

Following all the media attention, Polito issued an apology to Takei, he tells Romenesko.com: "I wrote an apology to George and Brad and their guy said he'd pass it on. I just said that I'd been looking for any mention of my book I could get and that I hadn't meant to expose anything. I don't update his page. I've had no direct contact with George. I've sent him some memes, as have other comedian types and I was happy for the exposure."

Ah, the Internet -- where nothing is as it seems.
Photo/Video credit: Getty Images