'Girls': The wound and the wounded

Girls-Allison-Williams-HBO.jpgTonight HBO's "Girls" spat out perfectly passive aggressive dialogue and drama, leaving viewers a bit anxious for what next week's season finale will bring. From Hannah's career envy, to her anger at Marnie's lack of enthusiasm, to their friendship-altering fight, "Leave Me Alone" is an ode to what goes wrong when one "distracts" themselves from "becoming the person they're meant to be."

Hannah is forced to acknowledge her stalled writing career when her college "nemesis," Tally ( Jenny Slate), publishes a buzzworthy book. She accuses Tally of being passive aggressive while being severely passive aggressive herself, only to wake up mad at herself and invigorated to "take a chance."

Marnie is realigning back into her old self -- after some moping and misguided bi-curiosity last week -- and begins to struggle to mask her irritation with Hannah. She drops clear signals that the living situation is no longer acceptable, and she urges Hannah to explore both romantic and professional opportunities with her old professor, Powell Goldman (played by Michael Imperioli).

Participating at the reading and starting a new job at a coffee shop are tiny steps in Hannah's struggle to succeed, but she needs to be taking leaps. The tension boils over in a painfully realistic, six-minute long argument scene between Marnie and Hannah. The build up and the density to the dialogue is enough to stress out even the viewer -- and once it spins out of control, they both let the insults (and toothbrushes) fly.

Both girls are "the wound" in their own way, but Marnie comes out the more sympathetic player: She's lost her boyfriend, and now it seems her best friend as well. Hannah is good at her core, but it's true when she says that right now "I don't really give a s***t about being a good friend."

Speaking of wounds, after an episode showcasing his potential sweetness, Adam's cruddy colors are showing again. He makes himself way too comfortable in Marnie and Hannah's apartment, and he has no interest in attending Hannah's reading or supporting her endeavors. His disinterest in other people's opinions is something Hannah could use a bit more of herself, but the relationship's fatal flaws are obvious.

Shoshanna is back to crack everyone up -- her breathless confession about internet dating is wonderful, as is her unbiased adoration of Tally's memoirs, which "really make her think."

Meanwhile, Jessa has a moment of beating around the bush with Katherine, who confronts her after the fallout from Jeff. Katherine admits that she has a dream of murdering Jessa, yet begs her return to work and points all the blame on Jeff. Jessa claims that she doesn't need her help, but it seems she could indeed use some mothering -- along with a therapist, a steady job and a life coach.

Oh, "Girls" -- so many wounds, so little time!

Girls Gag Index: "Leave Me Alone"

Least Passive Aggressive Moment: Leave it to Ray to be overly candid and blunt about everything (including white dresses). 
Favorite Moment: Seeing a salt and pepper haired Christopher Moltasanti -- er -- Michael Imperioli strut across the screens as an scholarly stud. How's that for HBO synergy?
Classic Shoshanna: "I'm meeting him at the cafe at the Old Navy flagship store.
Photo/Video credit: HBO