'Ironside' producers would like it if you didn't call the show a procedural

ironside-press-tour-nbc.jpgNBC's remake/redo of the 1960s-'70s cop show "Ironside" is a crime drama, but according to the people making it, it's not a procedural.

So what's the difference? Executive producer Ken Sanzel explains Saturday (July 27) at the TCA summer press tour.

"Procedurals are about process and kind of inevitably go to catching a bad guy at the end of the episode, says Sanzel, who previously worked as a writer and producer on "Blue Bloods" and "Numb3rs." "We'll catch plenty of bad guys, but as you see in the pilot, this is a man who -- because of who he was before, because of who he is now -- is driven to answer deeper questions about tragedy, having been steeped in some of his own."

"Ironside" stars Blair Underwood as a New York detective who was shot in the line of duty two years earlier and now is in a wheelchair. He carries some residual issues from the shooting, but has largely channeled any anger into his work, where he leads a hand-picked team of detectives and approaches cases from a not especially by-the-book angle.

Ironside's situation "doesn't necessarily just make him an angry guy, it makes him a driven guy. I think there's a little bit of a difference," Sanzel says. "I think he's probably an angrier guy than in the past, and now he's more consumed with all the things that would [as in the series pilot] lead a woman to jump off of a roof, when he knows it's just a suicide. He puts that in his pocket and takes us in 42 minutes through all the truth that happens with that.

"That's the key you use to open what makes this show special in the crime drama element, which I think is something that comes off of Ironside's situation."

"Ironside" is scheduled to premiere Oct. 2 on NBC.
Photo/Video credit: NBC