'Morgan Spurlock Inside Man': No bread, no pasta, no sugar, but wine is OK

Add to Favorites | Morgan Spurlock Inside Man
×
Remove from Favorites
Morgan Spurlock Inside Man has been added to your favorites.
OK
CANCEL
morgan-spurlock-inside-morgan-spurlock-cnn.jpg

When Morgan Spurlock shot to fame, he was gorging himself on McDonald's three times a day to see what happens if he lived off only that -- and he ate the largest size that workers pushed -- in "Super Size Me."

No shock that Spurlock could have inflicted permanent damage had he not stopped. In his CNN documentary series, "Morgan Spurlock Inside Man," Spurlock quaffs supplements and exercises.

In "Futurism," airing Sunday, April 20, Spurlock focuses on those striving for immortality. Since shooting that episode, Spurlock has lost 25 pounds.

"I am still losing weight," he tells Zap2it. "I am not eating carbohydrates, no bread, no pasta, no sugar. I feel better than I ever have. Last night I had wine at dinner. You have got to enjoy yourself."

He attends a party in California where people try various ways to extend their lives. Some take hundreds of supplements daily; others are on the paleo diet.

It would be a stronger show if Spurlock asked more questions such as: Why eat like a caveman? Why take so many vitamins? Spurlock has an incredibly thorough physical exam, and the doctor tells him to shed 18 pounds, take supplements and exercise.

Spurlock's goal is "to delve into issues that affect all of us, maybe in ways we don't even realize," he says. "A lot of times we see headlines and think they don't affect us. What the show does a great job of doing is showing how they do affect us."

Last week's Season 2 premiere was devoted to celebrity. Spurlock tried to be a paparazzo. Unless you're Angelina, Jen or a successful actor who dares to take the children to the playground, it's hard to see how paparazzi affect most people.

"What a lot of people don't realize is every time you buy a People, an Us, a Star, it does touch you," Spurlock says. "As you turn on the TV and watch 'TMZ' or 'Access Hollywood,' people are complicitly involved without recognizing their involvement."

Additional episodes look at religion, UFOs and paying student athletes.
Photo/Video credit: CNN