Nat Geo Wild's 'Destination Wild' heads to the Nile, Australia and more in 2014-15

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wild-namibia-natgeo-wild.jpgNat Geo Wild has greenlit four new specials as part of its "Destination Wild" programming for the fall, and Zap2it has your first look at the lineup.

The four specials -- "Wild Congo," "Wild Namibia," "Wild Nile" and "Wild Australia" -- will join the previously announced "Kingdom of the Apes" with Jane Goodall (premiering Sunday, July 13) and "Giant Pandas" (Sept. 28) as part of the Sunday-night series.

"As specials highlighting our incredible planet become more and more scarce, we wanted to lean into this genre and officially dedicate every Sunday night on Nat Geo Wild to this important strand," says Geoff Daniels, the channel's EVP and general manager. "Our Destination Wild programs have something for everyone from grandma to dad to your teen. Our goal is to bring families together one night each week to enjoy the miraculous wonders of our world in new and visually stunning ways."

Here's a rundown of the four new specials:

"Wild Congo" (Sept. 14, 9 p.m. ET/PT): Following the second-largest river in Africa from its source in Zambia, cameras will capture the wildlife in and around the Congo, ranging from hippopotamus bulls to sea turtles. It will also explore why the river is so important to both animals and people.

"Wild Namibia" (October; pictured above): Cameras follow lions, African elephants, meerkats and giraffes as they struggle for survival in the parched Namib Desert, one of the driest and harshest climates on the planet.

"Wild Nile" (November): The special will explore the ecosystem of the famous river, which supports elephants, lions, giraffes and some of the rarest animals in the world, including the Ethiopian wolf and Gelada baboon.

"Wild Australia" (January 2015): Aerial footage and images of rare animals highlight this look at the incredible diversity in both landscape and wildlife Down Under.
Photo/Video credit: Nat Geo Wild