'Necessary Roughness': Scott Cohen finds fun in slaps and kisses

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scott-cohen-325.jpg Zap2it: What's the state of the relationship between your "Necessary Roughness" character, mysterious problem solver Nico, and sports psychologist Dr. Dani Santino ( Callie Thorne)?

Scott Cohen: I personally think Nico's very much in love with Dani, [but] he keeps everything close to the vest. So he knows he can't enter into anything that might suggest a romantic interest in her, because that poses more problems for her. He's more concerned about her safety and protection more than anything else. What happens through the course of the season is that you feel he's very much interested in doing something about his desires but prevents himself.
So you see lots of tense moments between the two of them that, in the latter half of the season, come to a bubbling explosion.

Zap2it : She slapped his face in the season premiere. What was it like shooting that?

Scott Cohen: It was fun, actually. Callie was nervous at first, then I was like, "C'mon, hit me!" And she was OK. Kevin Dowling, our producer/director, he directed that episode. He said, "We're just gonna shoot it this way. We won't have to see the slap on this side, but we'll see the slap on the other side, so we won't do it now." And then, "Action!" Bam! It was like, "What the hell?" She got into it.

Zap2it : Is harder to shoot a kissing scene or a scene like that?

Scott Cohen: With her? It's easy to do anything. In general, I think a kissing scene is harder. A kissing scene is so intimate. A slap is also intimate, but a kissing scene ... there's more at stake for both actor and character.
Photo/Video credit: NewsCom