New Mattel doll spends her days 'waxing, plucking and shaving'

clawdeen-ken-mattel.jpgIs Mattel indoctrinating young girls to believe that life will be one big series of painful treatments in an attempt to defy nature? One expert says yes, thanks to Clawdeen Wolf -- one of the company's series of new "Monster High" dolls.

"These dolls are training girls to feel ashamed of their bodies, to focus on being sexually appealing and sexually attractive from a pre-pubescent age," human behavior and body image expert Patrick Wanis Ph.D told FOX411's Pop Tarts.

Clawdeen -- who sports a micro-mini and a waist possibly smaller than her Mattel cousin Barbie -- says that plucking is "a full-time job" but that it's "a small price to pay for being scarily fabulous."

So, yes, this doll is sending the message to elementary-aged girls that being a skanky daughter of a Werewolf is indeed one of many possible paths to take to adulthood. But, to be fair, Clawdeen should be taken in context -- the whole bit about shaving and plucking is meant to be a riff on the fact that she's part werewolf. And she's joined by several other dolls who don't mention any tweezer-related activity at all: Draculaura, daughter of Dracula; Frankie Stein, Frankenstein's kid; and Lagoona Blue, offspring of a sea monster.

All are equally over-sexualized, but not any more than Barbie herself. And Mattel also markets Shaving Fun Ken -- kids are encouraged to help Ken shave away the stubble to "help Ken look his best."

Lesson: Boys have something to be ashamed of, too.
Photo/Video credit: Mattel