'NUMB3RS'

Tvpartyw420This is pretty embarrassing, but we're not very good at math (we got a 490 on our math SATs). That's why we work with words now. And yet, we are fascinated by people like Charlie Eppes (David Krumholtz), who can solve horrific crimes with little more than a slide rule and some long division. So if you are ready to subtract your preconceived hang-ups about the math team geeks and add a few partiers to your living room, turn your TV to CBS on Friday night -- it's time to celebrate all that is NUMB3RS.

Setting the scene:
Let's re-create Charlie's office at California Institute of Science. The first thing you'll need is an old-school black porcelain chalkboard with a wood frame. On that, be sure to write out some insanely complicated math problem. Yes, something more than E equals MC2. Don't forget erasers. Next to that, place a large wooden teacher's desk covered in papers with an apple on top. Then pay a visit to the FBI's Web site -- it's their 100th anniversary! -- to see if your guests are wanted for anything. Download FBI logos for little touches at the party and have party favors like T-shirts and mugs with the FBI logo or Einstein novelties such as T-shirts that read, "OK, so what's the speed of dark?" A visit to the show's Web site also has a lot of great information to dazzle guests such as non-negative matrices, Venn diagrams and, um, fish bladders.

Attire:
Go preppy collegiate with brown corduroy blazers, jeans and an oxford shirt. Others may wish to go more official with clothing from the FBI or other agencies.

On the menu:
Pie! Get it? Pi? OK, only 3.14159 of you got that and that's sad.

On the hi-fi:
1234 by Feist; One by Three Dog Night; 1, 2, 3 by Gloria Estefan; 409 by the Beach Boys; 99 Luftballons by Nena; Mambo No. 5 by Lou Bega

The showstopper:
A show like NUMB3RS teaches us one thing -- our criminals have not had proper educational opportunities. If they had, they'd be one step ahead of Charlie. So why not visit the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Web site and print flyers for guests and other ne'er-do-wells to take free online courses at the college. They have offerings in everything from aeronautics and astronautics to writing and humanities. And it doesn't matter what you got on your SATs.