Patton Oswalt on the Boston Marathon bombings: 'The good outnumber you, and we always will'

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The horrifying explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon bring up reactions of shock, horror, fear and anger in most people. Those are fair emotions in the wake of something like this. But actor and comedian Patton Oswalt posted something a little different on his Facebook page. He explained why he can still have hope and love for humanity, even in the wake of horror.

Oswalt, an actor most recently seen as Constable Bob in this past season of "Justified," waited no time before expressing his feelings. Like many most likely did, he thought of the events of 9/11. And he wondered about the evil in humanity that could cause these events to happen.

That's fair, but as Oswalt was quick to point out, focusing on evil alone means ignoring the essential good of the majority of people. This would include the people seen in videos running toward the blasts, intending to help. Oswalt's full post is quoted below:

"Boston. F***ing horrible.

I remember, when 9/11 went down, my reaction was, 'Well, I've had it with humanity.'

But I was wrong. I don't know what's going to be revealed to be behind all of this mayhem. One human insect or a poisonous mass of broken sociopaths.

But here's what I DO know. If it's one person or a HUNDRED people, that number is not even a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a percent of the population on this planet. You watch the videos of the carnage and there are people running TOWARDS the destruction to help out. (Thanks FAKE Gallery founder and owner Paul Kozlowski for pointing this out to me). This is a giant planet and we're lucky to live on it but there are prices and penalties incurred for the daily miracle of existence. One of them is, every once in awhile, the wiring of a tiny sliver of the species gets snarled and they're pointed towards darkness.

But the vast majority stands against that darkness and, like white blood cells attacking a virus, they dilute and weaken and eventually wash away the evil doers and, more importantly, the damage they wreak. This is beyond religion or creed or nation. We would not be here if humanity were inherently evil. We'd have eaten ourselves alive long ago.

So when you spot violence, or bigotry, or intolerance or fear or just garden-variety misogyny, hatred or ignorance, just look it in the eye and think, 'The good outnumber you, and we always will.'"

Nothing can make death and explosions okay. But at least insights like this can make the future seem better.

Photo/Video credit: Getty Images