Michelle Pfeiffer: 'My best performance is still in me'

michelle-pfeiffer-people-like-us-gi.jpg Michelle Pfeiffer returned to Hollywood in the past year with three major films -- "Dark Shadows," "New Year's Eve" and the upcoming family drama, "People Like Us." Yet despite her impressive history of starring roles on the big screen, the actress believes something greater awaits, and she worries for colleagues that might not have the same idea.

"I'm always feeling that my best performance is still in me," the 54-year-old tells Zap2It on June 15. "And I think all artists feel that whether you're a painter, actor, a musician -- I hope so. I think it's what keeps me going."

"I've noticed a lot of people who win the Academy Award -- Best Actor, Best Actress -- they go through a long period where they don't work for a while and I worry about them," she says. "There's sort of that wanting to achieve that, which keeps you going, and then when you achieve it, it's like, 'Well, what now?' I don't ever want to lose that fire that I have for it."

Pfeiffer's new film, "People Like Us," opens in theaters June 29, and casts her as the widow of a famous rock musician, a stay-at-home wife who chose to pretend her husband's extramarital affairs were never an issue. The actress admits anyone can be taken in by "manipulative, selfish, and narcissistic" men.

She explains, "That kind of personality is a magnet and I think everyone is drawn to [it]. Some people are more vulnerable to it, and I think, certainly when you're young, you sort of want the person that doesn't want you. As you mature, hopefully you grow out of it."

Audiences can expect to see more of Pfeiffer in the coming years. She says her workload closely parallels her childrens' schedules and with both of them leaving the home for school she'll soon have more time for work.

"My daughter left for college last year; it was a big deal, not for her, for me," she says. "And I adjusted and I worked a lot. I think that was part of coping. I was avoiding the whole thing."

"Now I have one more year left with my son. I'm looking ahead ... I'm sort of good at looking ahead for disaster. I have like a radar for that -- meaning big empty nest syndrome for me. I think I'm preparing myself and I'm sort of slowly easing my way back into being in the work force." 

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