'Sharknado 2': 'The most important film made about climate change'

sharknado-2-the-second-one-new-york-city-syfy.jpgThe cast and crew of "Sharknado 2: The Second One" know exactly what they're making. Says director Anthony Ferrante, "You're making a movie called 'Sharknado,' and if you don't embrace it you end up with a movie that's not fun."

Ferrante and co-stars Mark McGrath, Kari Wuhrer and Judah Friedlander told reporters in Los Angeles ahead of the movie's July premiere that they embraced the low-budget, campy nature of their movie by taking it as seriously as possible.

Friedlander says he wanted to be a part of the sequel to Syfy's viral sensation because he loved the first movie. "It's unpretentious, fun, and it's the kind of movie you can turn on at any point ... and be locked in and want to finish it. It's communal."

Plus, adds Wuhrer, "when you're unpretentious you can be much more creative."

That's one thing Ferrante says worked about the first movie: Ian Ziering, in particular, was doused in blood and wielding a chainsaw -- and took it just as seriously as if he were in an Oscar movie. That's what makes the movie good (or a good guilty pleasure).

The sequel takes place in New York City, and is a very human, familial story, the cast says. It's relatable because "it's not like military and scientists and technobabble, it's a family dealing with weird stuff ... and trying to blow up tornadoes with bombs," says Ferrante.

And there's a scientific statement at work, too. Jokes Friedlander, "This, to me, is the most important film made about climate change."

"We were trying to emulate a blockbuster movie with their craft service budget for the day," says Ferrante.

"Sharknado 2: The Second One" premieres Thursday, July 31 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on Syfy.
Photo/Video credit: Syfy