'Super Fun Night' Season 2: What Rebel Wilson has in store if it's renewed

Add to Favorites | Super Fun Night
×
Remove from Favorites
Super Fun Night has been added to your favorites.
OK
CANCEL
rebel-wilson-super-fun-night-season-2-abc.jpgRebel Wilson's Kimmie might have chosen which guy she wanted to be with in the "Super Fun Night" Season 1 finale, but the creator and star tells Zap2it that she already knows where she wants to take the character -- and her two former wallflower friends -- in Season 2.

"I feel the show's tone is very performance-driven, and we push things -- especially in the dramatic sides of the characters, which we saw in the finale," Wilson says.

For a potential Season 2, which Wilson and showrunner John Riggi have already started planning, "we'll be going even further finding that balance between drama and comedy as the girls who thought they'd come out of their shells a bit before get sent into more difficult social situations and interactions that they have to overcome. So there's lots of cool things planned -- and of course, more musical numbers."

Wilson says she's learned a lot during her first year writing, producing and starring in a sitcom. "I'm just working on a movie right now so it's a lot more relaxed -- all we have to worry about is coming on and being funny. Whereas in 'Super Fun Night,' because I created the show, you're always worrying about everything and trying to get it better and trying to fight for jokes. It's very grueling. I think anyone who's gone through it will say the same."

She admires people like Tina Fey, Jerry Seinfeld and Roseanne Barr more now that she understands the rough schedule involved. "I loved them all before, then going through the network process I just understand what they all must have been through and it's so grueling," she says.

"We did 17 episodes in seven months from complete scratch -- writing them, making them, and putting them on air. It's so difficult, that amount of comedy. That's why I just have such respect for people who are currently doing it or have done it in the past. It's literally a seven-day-a-week job -- no breaks. I'm always like, 'I need a break! One week I had a broken toe and I couldn't stop. Couldn't stop the machine."

Another thing she's learned? What you can and can't say on television. "I wanted to say the words 't** rhino' the other day. You can't say that. I was like, 'Well, why not?' and then I sent back a very rude email to our standards lawyer that said, 'what about "cl** rhino," can I say that?" I don't think they like me very much. Sometimes they cut things and I don't know -- I find out when I see the episode!"
Photo/Video credit: ABC