TLC's 'Myrtle Manor' follows life at a South Carolina trailer park

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It seems almost overdue that TV cameras are just now turning the spotlight on a trailer park, but TLC's "Welcome to Myrtle Manor," airing Sundays, chronicles an eclectic trailer park community in South Carolina. The new 10-part series takes viewers inside Myrtle Manor, formerly Patrick's Mobile Home Park, located off Highway 15 in Myrtle Beach, and exposes them to the oddball personalities and everyday conflicts of the tenants who live there.

The cast of characters includes some reality show staples: the hot chicks ( Chelsey, Lindsay and Amanda), part of a hot dog business on wheels known as Darlin' Dogs; former drag queen Roy; kind-of-famous-in-Myrtle-Beach guy Taylor, a local club promoter, and his flirty, troublemaking girlfriend, Jessica; supposed TV jingle writer Bandit, who is close to eviction; 30-year resident Miss Peggy; freeloading new guy Jared; and a mix of others.

Landlord Becky Robertson, who is trying to turn the park into a five-star facility, explains, "we want to be the best trailer park in the world, but especially in Myrtle Beach."

Robertson has made improvements to the park, including the addition of a swimming pool, which helped with storylines.

"We never had a swimming pool, but I wanted one my entire life," she says, "so when my father gave me the ability to manage that section of the park, that's one of the first things I did."

As for dispelling the "trailer trash" stereotype, Robertson says people who think that really haven't been in a trailer park.

"You've got all kinds of people who live in trailer parks," she says, "young families just starting out, you got retired folks, you have people with vacation homes, and it's just like stereotyping anything else. Just because it's a trailer park doesn't mean it's a stereotypical trailer park. We have all kinds of people out here; it's not white trash. It's a safe place to live.

"You've got a unique, diversified group of people who live out here. Most of the people who live in our trailer park are here because they choose to live here."
Photo/Video credit: TLC