Trick or treat: 13 scary moments in 'Lost' history

jorgegarcia_lost_290.jpgWell, we're approaching the witching hour, " Lost" fans: not in terms of the show, but in terms of Halloween. Now, me myself and I? Not the biggest Halloween fan. Last time I dressed up, it was as possibly the most terrifying version of Avril Lavigne in the history of mankind. (I had no money. Wife beater + tie = Avril. You're welcome for that mental image.)

And since we're on the topic of the truly scary, I thought it appropriate to look at some of the scariest moments in "Lost" history. Now, "Lost" specializes more in the "shock and awe" department versus the "soil your drawers" department, but there's definitely been a fair share of creepy moments. This isn't a definitive list by any measure, but here are thirteen of the most terrifying things "Lost" has ever put onscreen. Why thirteen? Well, pretty scary number, no? And under no circumstances was I going to drop 666 moments. Even for me, that's a touch lengthy.

In no particular order...

Tom Friendly orders The Others to "Light 'em up!" in "The Hunting Party."

Long before we knew them as khaki-wearing book-club members, The Others consisted of a bearded man and a series of torches that seemingly appeared out of nowhere. While I have my problems with "The Hunting Party" as an episode, the stand-off near the ep's end is outstanding. The moment in which the torches light up sends chills up my spine every time, illuminating the nature of the threat they pose while refusing to shine light on their actual bodies.

The monster attacks Seth Norris in the "Pilot" episode.

A claustrophobic cockpit. The knowledge that the plane was a thousand miles off course. The faceless, enormous threat that reached and plucked our poor pilot our before filleting him to be served with a nice chianti in the treetops nearby. In terms of establishing a terrifying monster, you could do infinitely worse than this.

Claire dreams a little dream in "Raised by Another."

A little David Lynch found its way into "Lost" in this sequence. I'm not sure what's scarier: Locke's eyes (one white, one black) or the baby carriage filled with blood. I just know I want to move on before I have to think about either any more.

Charlie is found hung by his neck in "All the Best Cowboys Have Daddy Issues."

In terms of composition, the shot is stunning: Charlie, head covered, impossibly dangling from an impossibly tall set of trees. The upwards angle of the camera makes it look as if these trees stretch literally into the heavens. It's an unsparing shot. Bonus points for Jack's attempts to save him, coupled with Kate's frantic reactions, which add up to one of the show's most tense moments.

Walt kills a bird with his freakin' mind in "Special."

"You're not paying attention" is one of the single creepiest lines utter by anyone, and this is a show that's got Ben Linus in it, people. Maybe we'll never really learn what made Walt so "Special," but we know from this moment that this is a boy to be feared. Just ask Ben himself, who seemed awfully relieved to send him on a bearing of 325 way the hell away from The Island.

A single eye pops into view from the cabin in "The Beginning of the End."

Generally speaking, creepy stuff goes down in the cabin. But in terms of selecting just one, I'm going for this moment. Sure, it's a bit of a cheap gag, with the eye appearing just as Hurley leans in close to the window from the outside. But admit it: you jumped a bit after placing yourself six inches in front of the TV asking yourself what in God's name Christian Shephard was doing in there. OK, maybe you jumped more than a bit. Maybe there was girlish screaming involved. It's OK. I still like you.

michaelemerson_lost_290.jpg "Henry Gale" asks Jack and Locke for some milk in "The Whole Truth."

If the dairy industry ever wanted to make sure no one ever drank milk again, all they'd have to do is air this scene. I mean, come on. Perhaps aside from him sharing an Apollo Bar with Hurley in "Cabin Fever," this might be my favorite Ben moment of all time.

Karl watches an instructional video in "Not in Portland."

Look, me and mind control don't get along. I don't like hypnotism, I don't like The Borg, and I really don't like Room 23. Gives me both the heebies AND the jeebies, and neither in small amounts.

Bai Ling in "Stranger in a Strange Land."

I mean, seriously.

Jin and Eko watch The Others silently walk past them in "...And Found."

Just when the freakiness of their silence threatens to make your spine literally pop out of your back, along comes the teddy bear. And then you realize you haven't taken a breath for about a minute.

Ben Linus surveys The Barracks in the wake of The Purge in "The Man Behind the Curtain."

It's one of the show's signature moments: Ben Linus returns from killing his father to find the majority of the Dharma Initiative dead. There's something both beautiful and horrifying in watching the camera slowly pan over the carnage.

Montand loses his arm in "This Place is Death."

The ultimate Sam Raimi-esque moment for "Lost." I squealed! I giggled! It was better than "Cats!" And way bloodier, too.

Jack tells Kate they have to go back in "Through the Looking Glass."

Not scary in the way the other moments are. It was scary in terms of realizing that what we thought "Lost" was about (getting off the Island) and we no longer had any bearings whatsoever as viewers. In other words, we were lost. Hopelessly lost. Just how we like it.

Those are my suggestions. What are some of yours?

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