Suicide outside Paula Abdul's house? Why did Paula Goodspeed die?

Tonight on "Inside Edition," you can visit the scene outside Paula Abdul's home in Sherman Oaks, Calif., where a young fan may have committed suicide.

Paula Goodspeed was a self-described fan of the "American Idol" judge. There is no known reason why she would have committed suicide outside Abdul's home, other than to be close at the end of her life to her apparent idol. Or to have her name forever linked with Abdul's.

Goodspeed's body was found inside her car, which was decorated with a photo of Abdul hanging from the rear-view mirror. Her personalized license plate reads "ABL LV," which has been said to stand for Abdul Love.

"Ms. Goodspeed's mother had gone to [the sheriff's department] to report her daughter missing and advised them that she might be suicidal," Los Angeles Police Capt. James Miller tells People. Officials "determined that Ms. Goodspeed may be up in the vicinity by Paula Abdul's house. Our officers discovered her vehicle parked on the street and found her inside. She was unresponsive to officers."

Authorities say her death may have been due to drug overdose, but tests still have to be performed.

Turns out Goodspeed auditioned for "American Idol" in 2005 and admitted a lifelong fascination with Abdul.

"I really like Paula Abdul a lot. She's really cool. ... I'm like a really big fan and I make life-size drawings of Paula. I've been drawing ever since I was a little kid, and my first drawing was of Paula Abdul." 

Goodspeed attended the Austin, Texas, tryouts wearing braces and dressed like a gypsy, a look said to be inspired by Abdul. "Definitely, I really think I'm a pop star. They call me fashion genius."

Even "American Idol" judge Simon Cowell noticed Goodspeed's resemblance to Abdul.

Cowell observed, "A similarity here ... more than just the name. ... I see it definitely."

But the judges weren't impressed with Goodspeed's version of Tina Turner's "Proud Mary." Simon Cowell was downright rude, especially about her braces. As co-judge Randy Jackson said, "That was terrible. What was that?"

Afterward, Goodspeed vented in an expletive-filled post-audition interview. "I was pitchy on a couple of notes. Big ... deal. ... They send a lot to HW that can't even really hold a note. It's not over and I'm not gonna stop singing just cause you don't like my voice."

Frankly, we're surprised more kids haven't felt suicidal, suffered from depression or developed mental or emotional problems after an "Idol" audition. Those dudes' remarks are often pretty harsh!

What do you think? Was this just a matter of time or an isolated incident?