'Wicked Tuna': TJ Ott prefers Outer Banks fishing to the Oregon Inlet

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Zap2it: How far out off North Carolina's Outer Banks did you have to go to get bluefin tuna?

TJ Ott, of "Wicked Tuna": We were going out to "the point," the continental shelf. ... The beauty of the Outer Banks is it's way closer to get to the blue water and to the continental shelf and the edges that we fish there, which hold the feed, which ultimately hold the tuna looking for the feed. "The point" is about 35 miles from Oregon Inlet, which is the worst inlet on the East Coast, hands down. ... It's also where the gulfstream comes in very, very close. I think it's the second-closest place on the East Coast outside of Florida, and it immediately turns to the east offshore. If you tried to get to gulfstream waters (off New England), you'd have to go out about 500 miles, but down there you only have to go 35-40 miles, which is pretty amazing. So that's another reason why those fish are there. It's a really amazing ecosystem and it's very accessible.

Zap2it: What makes Oregon Inlet so bad?

TJ Ott: What happens is, if they get any sort of swell or northeast or east wind, a groundswell will build up on the bar and they have an extremely strong outgoing tide there. So when those two things meet in that six or seven feet of water on the outer bar, it's a breaking, surfable wave and it's unnavigable. And I don't care how great a boatsman you are or how great your boat is, you'll blow your windows out, you'll roll over. I mean, no tuna fish is worth that.
Photo/Video credit: National Geographic